Horror movies…are you a fan or a foe?

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This weekend I’ve been catching up on my horror movies. Last night I caught a flick that was obviously a SAW knock-off and another movie called “The Bunnyman”, which was about a killer who dressed in a bunny suit (yeah, it was about as scary as it sounds). Tonight, I am watching a movie about spoiled, ungrateful grandkids and their dead grandmother who wants to get revenge for being ignored all her life. Not sure how that one is going to turn out, but guessing that the airheaded girls the boys brought over to party are going to die pretty soon.

Anyhow, catching up on my scary quota has gotten me thinking about the debate around horror movies. Some people believe that horror movies are psychologically damaging and that the violence contained in them encourages violence in real life. Others, such as Stephen King (the master of scary himself) believe that horror movies are just for fun or good for letting off steam. Once I read an essay by King which explained that in his opinion, watching horror movies gives us a “safe” way to get out our baser emotions and instincts so that we don’t act on those feelings in real life.

My opinion is that horror movies are often good for a laugh (many of them are more funny than scary). I also think that horror movies can be a good way to feel better about your own life since (hopefully) you aren’t currently being tortured or murdered. I do think many horror movies are stupid and pointless which may be why I prefer psychological thrillers and supernatural scaryness to the predictable “slasher” flicks. I also prefer ones that have some kind of good triumphing against evil in the end. I don’t really enjoy movies where all the “good guys” die in the end because there seems to be no real resolution. Of course, those are personal preferences though.

So, how do you feel about horror movies?

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6 thoughts on “Horror movies…are you a fan or a foe?

  1. I’m with you on horror often being good for a laugh: part of why I love them (and well-done gore) is that they have a “Can you believe they did THAT?!” factor that really makes you giggle.

    I was curious what movies you were referencing in the first paragraph! If you’re still on a kick, High Tension (2003) is very intense (as promised) but very good.

    • Honestly, I don’t remember the names of the movies I was watching other than the Bunnyman one. They were all on the Chiller channel though. They show a lot of B horror flicks, some that are super bad, but pretty funny. In the flick I watched tonight one guy even got flushed down the toilet lol. I’ll definitely have to check out the movie you mentioned.

  2. I like my high drama to be confined to celluloid and my life to be incredibly boring haha. I probably watched too many horror films as a kid (seriously, my dad let me watch A Nightmare On Elm Street aged 7) so I thought I was impervious to screen violence but a few years ago, any films about serial killers or psychopaths started to really scare me as they are horrors that have happened in the real world, rather than the frankly ludicrous idea of a possessed clown doll etc. I guess they blessed/ cursed me with a vivid imagination.

    Anyway, I wrote a blog post on our local horror movie festival today and looking through all the trailers, I think there’s way more interesting/ psychological horror from the 40s-60s, because of the Hays code, this era mastered the art of suspense and subtle creepiness and just plain fun hokiness. So there is a place for horror but all those torture porn type things like (Saw or Hostel) they’re so keen to push at the moment are quite wrong if you ask me.

    • Thanks for commenting and I agree that many of the older suspense/horror movies are actually creepier than the blood and gore stuff of today. I also grew up watching horror movies. In fact, the first movie I ever remember seeing in a movie theater was “Arachnophobia”. I was a really good reader as a kid too, so when I was 8 or 9 I started reading my dad’s Stephen King books and my older sister’s V.C. Andrews books. Luckily, all of that didn’t seem to mess me up too badly (that I’ve noticed anyway).

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