Being indie isn’t easy!

There is one thing I have sure found out in a hurry, in the world of writing, if you aren’t one of the bigwigs, there is a definite stigma and many doors are slammed in your face. “Indie” writers is a term that you often hear used to refer to authors who self-publish or publish with a small publisher that isn’t well known.

There is some argument about whether authors published by small traditional publishers are really “indie” or not, but in the business, they are often considered so. I have self-published and signed contracts with small traditional publishers, so I figure I definitely fit into the “indie” group one way or another. Anyhow, here are a few things I have learned in the short time I have been a “professional” author:

  • Getting your book into a big chain bookstore is almost impossible. I figured Barnes and Noble and Books-A-Million would be happy to have me sell my books at their local branches and do author events. Boy was I wrong! I mean, I knew that the entire chain wouldn’t carry my books unless they became popular enough, but I figured at least the local stores would work with me, but the corporate powers-that-be won’t let them.
  • Getting your book into an independent bookstore isn’t much easier. Yeah, they are normally more willing to take a chance on local authors, but with the way the economy is right now, many of our local bookstores are barely keeping afloat or are in the red, so they just aren’t willing to take those chances right now.
  • Libraries can be kind of snobby, at least some of them. They will carry crappy quality books from major publishers (why else would they carry books by Paris Hilton, Snooki and the like?), but they can be EXTREMELY picky when it comes to unknown authors and publishers. They may turn you down with a reason that seems flimsy and ridiculous, but swarm to the newest fluff put out by celebrities. Of course, not all library systems are like that and sometimes they turn indie books down for good reason (like lack of funds).
  • Getting into local schools isn’t a piece of cake either unless you know someone personally. Many schools seem almost suspicious of authors they have never heard of, maybe because our society has become so crazy and schools have to be extra-careful about what kind of people they allow near their students. I can totally understand their point of view, but it still makes it difficult on us children’s writers.
  • Lastly, if you really want to be a success, you have to take advantage of every opportunity you DO get. Most of the businesses I have found who are willing to hold author events aren’t the ones I expected. Try coffee shops, art centers, community organizations and anywhere else you can think of. After all, the worst they can do is say no, right?

Are printed books really endangered?

With the advent and increasing popularity of ebooks, many doomsday prophets are now proclaiming that printed books will quickly meet their demise. I have heard experts claim that within the next 50 years, traditional books are destined to go the way of vinyl records. They might be used for decoration or sought out by collectors, but other than that, books as we have always known them will be obsolete.

Is this true? I hate to think so. Now, don’t get me wrong. I am not one of those purists who believe that ereaders are evil or anything, in fact I own a Kindle myself, but I still prefer the feel of a real book in my hands. Maybe I am old-fashioned or sentimental, but nothing will ever feel the same to me as flipping the pages of a new book.

I don’t really want to live in a world where the only place I can buy books is Amazon either. I like the convenience and wide diversity of internet bookstores, but I would much rather browse a brick and mortar store. I could literally spend hours in a cozy bookstore reading area. I prefer to sit down and try a book out before I buy it. Plus, in the bookstore I get to snoop around to see what other people are reading and get in some people watching, which happen to be two of my favorite pastimes.

As an author, I can also attest to the fact that there is nothing like holding your own book in your hands. I have had both ebooks and traditional books published, and the ebooks don’t elicit near the excitement from myself or others as the handheld ones do. This fact gives me hope for the future of traditional literature. What about you? Do you think that printed books are on their last leg? If so, will you consider it a great loss?