“Borderline” Book Review

516e8gVuIRL

Right now I’m reading a pretty cool book called “Borderline”, written by Mishell Baker, which is the first book in the author’s “The Arcadia Project” series. The main reason I wanted to read this book was because the main character (Millie) happens to have borderline personality disorder and the book focuses on that a lot.

The story starts out pretty sad, with Millie in a psych facility, trying to rehabilitate from a failed suicide attempt that caused her to have to have both legs amputated. Sounds like a real heartwarming tale, huh? But things get better and more interesting when Millie is recruited to work for something called “The Arcadia Project”, which is an organization that trains mentally ill patients to work with fairies…yes, you read that right, FAIRIES. The plot really starts rolling when Millie is given the task of hunting down a missing member of the fairy community who also happens to be a movie star.

So, to encapsulate the novel, this book is a hodgepodge of mental illness, tragedy, mystery, Hollywood, magic, and fantasy. And somehow…it all works really well together. I don’t normally read a whole lot of fantasy fiction, but the spin on bpd made me give this one a chance and I’m glad I did!

Advertisements

Happy Art – Pegasus and Sunshine

DSC08307

I share a lot of darker art and writing on this blog, so thought today I would share some bright, happy art! I like the way this ACEO art trading card came out, featuring a pegasus and a swirly sun. I also added a bit of pastel splatters to dress it up a bit more. Stuff like this is just pure fun to make and share ūüôā Currently up for sale on my Ebay!

Adult Coloring is Art

In my opinion, adult coloring is art, and it does take at least some artistic talent to create a visually appealing adult coloring book picture. Of course, I’m probably biased since lately adult coloring has been a hobby I’ve been into, but since several people have bought pieces I colored from my Ebay store, I guess I’m not completely crazy for thinking it is artistic. Here are a few of my favorite pictures I’ve colored recently:

21432779_1495773467128072_8124528509212060119_n.jpg

21463295_1495773507128068_7186300273536600165_n.jpg

21369136_1491609910877761_91797082748955218_n.jpg

21271029_1491609787544440_1061814158367821481_n.jpg

22154465_1517097004995718_8653728472245396724_n.jpg

 

 

Pony Gods

Theodor_Kittelsen_-_N√łkken_som_hvit_hest.jpg

Pony Gods
Written By: Maranda Russell

I pray to the Pony Gods.
I don’t know if they listen,
or even if they care,
but sometimes
they do seem to answer.

Why the Pony Gods?
Why not?

I figure the Pony Gods
have just as much a chance
of being good –
or being real
as the human ones.

Why “Mockingjay” (the last book of the Hunger Games trilogy) depressed me

0439023513

After seeing the Mockingjay Part 1 movie in theatres, I finally decided to read the entire Hunger Games trilogy. I had read bits of it in the past, enough to know the main plot of each book, but I had never really sat down and read them all cover to cover. Last night I finished the last book in the series. And I must admit that after I turned the final page, I found myself deeply depressed. To me, the last book was very much a downer, even more so than the previous two books.

So, I sat in our library looking at our darkened Christmas tree and wondering why I felt so morose. I finally decided there were several reasons I found the conclusion of the series so disturbing. First, it felt like the last book was filled with the agony of multitudes dying, often for no good reason (as is the reality in war). In the first two books, most of the deaths were related to the tributes participating in the Hunger Games or were the slow, gradual kind of deaths caused by the perils of poverty. In Mockingjay, the deaths seemed constant throughout, not just a few people here and a few there. Understandably, the thought of mass death and the destruction of the world all around us causes immense despair, even if only on a subconscious level.

Another issue was the very real idea that no matter how many immoral and violent governments, presidents, dictators and groups we remove from power or destroy, there are always just as many waiting in the wings to dole out their own¬†brand of pain and injustice. Even¬†at the end of the book when things seem a bit more hopeful, we know that the world is not safe and secure. The world is never actually safe and secure, no matter how much we may choose to live in denial. Even among those brave enough to rebel against injustice and evil, you will find cruelty, deception and betrayal. Many of those people don’t even realize that they are no better than¬†the enemy they seek to destroy. Vengeance and victory¬†may give us a brief respite, but eventually the same old problems seem to find their way back.

Lastly, it is incredibly depressing how war leaves those who survive broken. Maybe not always physically (although there is plenty of that), but deep down on the inside, the trauma of warfare leaves many human beings irrevocably damaged. Survivors are left with wounds that cannot help but affect the next generation, sometimes starting unending cycles of mental illness and abuse. Often hatred and bias is passed down much the same way, even if it is done so with millions of seemingly insignificant words and attitudes. If we could truly see the damage done by war throughout all space and time, we would probably be shocked by how far the effects trickle down.

After thinking about all that, I guess it is no wonder I found myself discouraged. Perhaps the worst part of all though is that¬†when it comes to fighting for freedom and justice, we are often¬†damned if we do and damned if we don’t.

The most memorable books I read during October 2014

love-of-books

Starting this month, I am starting a new series of posts where I will list the most memorable books I have read in the past month and why they made such an impact on me. These aren’t necessarily “the best” books, but instead are the ones that really stuck with me for one reason or another.¬†This list may include books for any age group or genre. I read a broad range of books, both fiction and non-fiction, so you never know what you may find in my monthly list! To get us started, here is my list of the five¬†most memorable¬†books I have read in October 2014!

1. The Flat Rabbit by Barour Oskarsson. This had to be one of the weirdest, least politically correct picture books I have ever read! It had me, my mom and my husband laughing out loud though. It is morbidly hilarious to see a rabbit flattened, then to see his neighbors scrape him off the road, attach him to a kite and fly him in the air. Not sure this is really a great book for kids, but it is hilarious for adults.

2.¬†Breaking Stalin’s Nose by Eugene Yelchin. This middle grade historical¬†novel stuck with me because it is the story of a child who¬†grew up thinking¬†Stalin and communism are the best things in the world, only to see how flawed the system truly is and how he has been led to believe things that aren’t true at all. To me, this idea¬†that it is possible to fight¬†for something you believe is right and then find out later¬†that it is actually wrong is a profound lesson to learn.

3.¬†History of a Suicide: My Sister’s Unfinished Life by Jill Bialosky. This adult memoir struck a little too close to home, but then again, that is why I picked it up in the first place. Since I have also had a sister commit suicide, I could easily and sometimes painfully relate to much of what this writer had to say. The circumstances and details might be different from case to case, but anyone who has lost a loved one to suicide would likely¬†see much of their own suffering and search for healing¬†reflected in this memoir.

4.¬†I Never Saw Another Butterfly: Children’s Drawings & Poems from Terezin Concentration Camp, 1942-44 by various authors. As the title states, this nonfiction book is a collection of poems and drawings that were created by children imprisoned in a WWII concentration camp. Some of the book is funny and cute, some of it is sad and depressing, but it all shows the innocence and strength of the children who were mistreated during this horrible time. It also shows the loss of life and joy this world suffered due to ignorance and hatred.

5.¬†The Night Fairy by Laura Amy Schlitz. This middle grade fantasy novel was a fun and enjoyable read. By the time I finished it, I was wishing to be a night fairy myself. I’ve always been a night owl anyways, so why not? Although the story starts out rather sad (with the fairy losing her wings in a terrible accident), things quickly start to look up and by the end of the novel, the little fairy is better off for the experiences she has had – both good and bad.

An interesting thought about the afterlife

spirtual_traveler_German_woodcut_1590(1)

Ok, this post may be a bit out there, a mix of philosophical musing and fantasy stories, but thought I would share just for fun. Right now I am reading the Riley Bloom series, written by Alyson Noel. This fantasy series is based on the premise that the main character, a 12-year-old girl is dead and on the other side (heaven, or at least one of the levels of heaven). Anyhow, while I was reading the book, I found myself fascinated with some of the ideas of heaven the author had. For instance, while in spirit form, deceased people have the ability to manifest anything they want or need. Want an ice cream sundae…picture it and there you have it. Want a cool new building…imagine it and it is yours. Want to fly? Just desire it. Have something to say to someone? Just send the message telepathically.¬†

So anyhow, this book had me thinking something I’ve thought before….what if in our true state, our original state (spirit), we do have those abilities? What if we existed in spirit before being born and we unconsciously remember having those abilities? Could that be why humans have such a desire to create…because it comes so naturally…is so innate? Could our attempts to create art, music, literature, objects, technology, etc., be us trying to grasp some of that amazing manifesting power that¬†seems to be¬†out of our reach here on the earth plane? Is that why so many of us fantasize or dream about flying (without an airplane)? Do we miss the ease of communication we once had if we were able to communicate telepathically?

In no way do I think this would nullify or violate a belief in God. For it would seem logical to me that if God made us in his image we may have inherited some of his abilities in spirit form, or¬†perhaps these aren’t even special “abilities” but just how things are done in the spirit world. Of course, I know some people really have an issue with believing we existed in spirit before coming to earth, but who really knows? Only God really knows where our souls were before being put into human bodies…and only God knows how time actually works (or if it even exists).

Well, just a few late-night thoughts for all my readers. Maybe I’m just up too late and thinking too hard lol. Hope you enjoy my little musings and that it gives you something to spark your¬†imagination and love of mystery…even if you don’t consciously¬†believe the fantasy.